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  Monday, December 22, 2014
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Sgt. Cimino Decorated
By Rick Winterson

                                        

                      Veterans' activists Tom Lyons           The Marine Color Guard and

                      and Purple Heart recipient                 the Gaelic Fire Brigade at

                      Sgt. Domenick Cimino.                        Marine Sgt. Domenick

                                                                                 Cimino's Purple Heart Award

                                                                                 ceremony.             

                                          

                       Sgt. Domenick Cimino, USMC,              City Councilor Jim Kelly at

                       recipient of the Order of the              Marine Sgt. Domenick Cimino's

                       Purple Heart, with Col. Ron                Purple Heart Award ceremony.

                       Johnson, CO of the 24th Marine        

                       Expeditionary Unit, Tom Lyons,

                       and Maj. Shane Tomko.

                                               

                                             Sgt. Dominick Cimino, USMC,

                                             receives the Purple Heart from

                                             Col. Ron Johnson, USMC, CO of

                                             the 24th Marine Expeditionary

                                             Unit.  Congressman Stephen

                                             Lynch looks on.                                            

     This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Vietnam Memorial situated in Medal of Honor Park.  The first event of the Memorial’s Anniversary season occurred last Sunday evening, May 28.

     The event was the presentation of the Purple Heart medal to Sgt. Domenick Cimino, USMC, for wounds he sustained on combat duty in Afghanistan.  His wounds, which were quite serious, required that he be evacuated before getting his medal in the field, so the presentation ceremony took place on Sunday.  The Purple Heart was conferred on Sgt. Cimino by Col. Ron Johnson, the Commanding Officer of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

     Between 100 and 200 people attended the ceremony.  Promptly at 6:30 p.m., the colors were posted by a Marine guard, to the accompaniment of the Gaelic Fire Brigade.  Tom Lyons, well known in Boston for activism on behalf of veterans, had arranged the ceremony, and served as its emcee.  Marine Major Shane Tomko sang the Natinal Anthem.

     Lyons remarked that we need to be reminded, but not told, of the sacrifices made by the men and women who gave their lives defending the nation.  “How many dreams have died here”, he said, which is a Civil War epitaph.  We are again at war, so Lyons thanked everyone for remembering on Memorial Day, and then introduced Congressman Stephen Lynch.

     Lynch’s remarks centered on his trips to Iraq and the Middle East.  He said that the men and women in the armed forces there have issues, but they also demonstrate extraordinary courage and inspiration.  According to Lynch, they say, “We’re doing nothing different than our parents and grandparents did.”  Lynch closed by asking a question he frequently poses when he speaks:  “Where do we find such men and women?”

     Jim Kelly spoke briefly.  He received sustained applause and cheers for his words.  A number of other officials were present as well – Maura Doyle, Maura Hennigan, Gene Vaillancourt, William Galvin, and Bob Dello Russo.

     The formal awarding of the Purple Heart to Sgt. Cimino then took place.  Col Johnson reminded the crowd that George Washington himself created this particular medal.  Three wreaths were laid upon the Vietnam Memorial; “Taps” closed the observance.

     In a telephone interview the next day, Sergeant Domenick Cimino said he joined the Marine Corps in response the 9/11 tragedy.  He said he considered it “as the defining moment of my generation”.  He didn’t want to look back in later years and regret not taking part.

     Cimino was brought up in the North End.  He’s the son of Joe and Beth Cimino, and has an older sister, Nicole, and two younger brothers, Joseph and Michael.  Cimino had completed two years at Tufts and the Museum School, where he was studying for a Bachelor’s in Fine Arts (Printmaking).  He left school, enlisted in the Marines, and after basic training, he served two tours of duty in Afghanistan. 

     It was in the village of Asadabad, Afghanistan, that Cimino was wounded by a large roadside bomb.  He suffered extensive shrapnel wounds, as well as a major loss of hearing.  But he has no regrets – he’s alive, and he has a future.

     Currently, Cimino is taking some courses at the Harvard Extension School.  He and his girl friend, Kari Warner, are great company for each other.  He’s reviewing various options, including a return to his BFA in printmaking.

     Welcome home, Sgt. Cimino, and thank you.

     This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Vietnam Memorial situated in Medal of Honor Park.  The first event of the Memorial’s Anniversary season occurred last Sunday evening, May 28.

     The event was the presentation of the Purple Heart medal to Sgt. Domenick Cimino, USMC, for wounds he sustained on combat duty in Afghanistan.  His wounds, which were quite serious, required that he be evacuated before getting his medal in the field, so the presentation ceremony took place on Sunday.  The Purple Heart was conferred on Sgt. Cimino by Col. Ron Johnson, the Commanding Officer of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

     Between 100 and 200 people attended the ceremony.  Promptly at 6:30 p.m., the colors were posted by a Marine guard, to the accompaniment of the Gaelic Fire Brigade.  Tom Lyons, well known in Boston for activism on behalf of veterans, had arranged the ceremony, and served as its emcee.  Marine Major Shane Tomko sang the Natinal Anthem.

     Lyons remarked that we need to be reminded, but not told, of the sacrifices made by the men and women who gave their lives defending the nation.  “How many dreams have died here”, he said, which is a Civil War epitaph.  We are again at war, so Lyons thanked everyone for remembering on Memorial Day, and then introduced Congressman Stephen Lynch.

     Lynch’s remarks centered on his trips to Iraq and the Middle East.  He said that the men and women in the armed forces there have issues, but they also demonstrate extraordinary courage and inspiration.  According to Lynch, they say, “We’re doing nothing different than our parents and grandparents did.”  Lynch closed by asking a question he frequently poses when he speaks:  “Where do we find such men and women?”

     Jim Kelly spoke briefly.  He received sustained applause and cheers for his words.  A number of other officials were present as well – Maura Doyle, Maura Hennigan, Gene Vaillancourt, William Galvin, and Bob Dello Russo.

     The formal awarding of the Purple Heart to Sgt. Cimino then took place.  Col Johnson reminded the crowd that George Washington himself created this particular medal.  Three wreaths were laid upon the Vietnam Memorial; “Taps” closed the observance.

     In a telephone interview the next day, Sergeant Domenick Cimino said he joined the Marine Corps in response the 9/11 tragedy.  He said he considered it “as the defining moment of my generation”.  He didn’t want to look back in later years and regret not taking part.

     Cimino was brought up in the North End.  He’s the son of Joe and Beth Cimino, and has an older sister, Nicole, and two younger brothers, Joseph and Michael.  Cimino had completed two years at Tufts and the Museum School, where he was studying for a Bachelor’s in Fine Arts (Printmaking).  He left school, enlisted in the Marines, and after basic training, he served two tours of duty in Afghanistan. 

     It was in the village of Asadabad, Afghanistan, that Cimino was wounded by a large roadside bomb.  He suffered extensive shrapnel wounds, as well as a major loss of hearing.  But he has no regrets – he’s alive, and he has a future.

     Currently, Cimino is taking some courses at the Harvard Extension School.  He and his girl friend, Kari Warner, are great company for each other.  He’s reviewing various options, including a return to his BFA in printmaking.

     Welcome home, Sgt. Cimino, and thank you



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